Journalists pose as boat people

http://www.canberratimes.com.au/world/undercover-journalists-publish-firsthand-account-of-asylum-seeker-journey-to-australia-20131116-2xnd6.html

Advertisements

Tom Wolfe and New Journalism in The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test

Reading this book, you can’t help but feel a sense of being there with the Merry Pranksters on their journey.  tom_wolfe_05

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Web Design, Coding, Standards and Semantics

I am currently designing a website for a publishing house as part of a web design project using HTML 5 and CSS.

I recommend following this conversation below, which explains why HTML 5 should be used in the best semantic way possible:

http://www.webdirections.org/blog/five-reasons-why-you-should-quote-attribute-values-in-html5/

From my experience, ARIA Landmark Roles are the most semantic and viable to use in production:

rotor

Ara Pehlivanian sums it up nicely, “I think it’s always best to err on the side of verbosity when coding, whether it’s quotes, brackets or closing tags. It just mitigates errors and improves legibility. If you want to save bytes on the page, trust a tool to do it for you either at deployment or in real time via a script on your server. Don’t do it yourself. You’re only going to run into trouble.”

In my recent coding I have been using the Dreamweaver software program, and it is in real time. There is also the option to validate the coding as you go. Trouble avoided!

If you’re interested in all geeky HTML things, another blog I’ve been reading of late is: http://ablognotlimited.com/

On Writing Leads

* Please note this work belongs to the Queanbeyan Age. All rights reserved.

This is the before and after of one of my late stories, polished by my editor.

The lead is strong in this story, it is a colourful example, which offers the reader a vivid and interesting introduction.

Previously my lead didn’t throw to the situation, and was more factual. In this scenario the colour added to what was otherwise a very run of the mill type of article.

The structure is also improved, re, ordering of points.

Roundabout Time – before

STOP signs positioned at all but one of four entries into the Donald and Southbar road intersection in Queanbeyan has left drivers at their own crossroads.

Do they go and risk being plummeted into by another driver, or do they stop?

Locals told The Queanbeyan Age that the intersection was a major safety concern. Donald Road resident Anthony Perrott said the main danger  was its “confusing” design.

“People coming up the hill don’t seem to stop, they think it is confusing,” Mr Perrott said.

“I know my road rules, you give right of way to the right so the stop signs are a bit ridiculous, but I know a lot of people around here don’t realise what to do,” Mr Perrott said.

“You’re supposed to stop [at a stop sign], not keep rolling,” he said.

Mr Perrott moved to Donald road one year ago with his partner, and he has already witnessed several near misses.  With a number of roundabouts in close proximity, Mr Perrott encouraged another to ease traffic congestion.

“There are still going to be accidents certainly, but it might slow people down a bit, it is about time something is done,” he said.

There have been ten reported crashes at the intersection in the last five years alone, placing the junction at the forefront of the Queanbeyan City Council’s funding plans.

Without the assistance of the Queanbeyan City Council, the project would not have been feasible, said Roads Minister Duncan Gay.

“The NSW Government has allocated $308,000 for the new roundabout with a further $308,000 provided by Queanbeyan City Council which will carry out the work,” Minister Gay said.

While locals such as Mr Perrott feel confident about the road rules, it is Canberra drivers in particular that concerned Member for Monaro, John Barilaro.

“At this intersection it is a common occurrence to find ACT plated vehicles frozen by uncertainty; foot on the brake, mouth agape, unsure when to go and who to give way to,” Mr Barilaro said.

Known for its many roundabouts, it is expected that Canberra will rejoice in Queanbeyan’s newest addition, but they won’t be the only ones.

Nearby, Crestview Tourist Park operates, adding to the traffic congestion and strain in the hot spot.   A spokesperson said that the development would be welcomed, as visitors unfamiliar with the area were easily confused.

The roundabout is planned to be completed by end of April next year.

Construction of the roundabout will take 14 weeks, and is due to start early next year following design approval from NSW Roads and Maritime Services.

After

STOP signs positioned at three of the four entries into the Donald and Southbar road intersection in Queanbeyan has left drivers at their own crossroads.

Do they go and risk being plummeted into by another driver, or do they stop and wait?

However a new roundabout is set to put an end to the confusion, with the NSW Government and Queanbeyan City Council each contributing $308,000 to the upgrade.

Locals told The Queanbeyan Age that the intersection had been a major safety concern. Donald Road resident Anthony Perrott said the main danger was its “confusing” design.

“People coming up the hill don’t seem to stop, they think it is confusing,” Mr Perrott said.

“I know my road rules, you give right of way to the right so the stop signs are a bit ridiculous, but I know a lot of people around here don’t realise what to do,” Mr Perrott said.

“You’re supposed to stop [at a stop sign], not keep rolling,” he said.

Mr Perrott moved to Donald road one year ago with his partner, and he has already witnessed several near misses. With a number of roundabouts in close proximity, Mr Perrott encouraged another to ease traffic congestion.

“There are still going to be accidents certainly, but it might slow people down a bit, it is about time something is done,” he said.

There have been ten reported crashes at the intersection in the last five years alone, placing the junction at the forefront of the Queanbeyan City Council’s funding plans.

While locals such as Mr Perrott feel confident about the road rules, it is Canberra drivers in particular that concerned Member for Monaro, John Barilaro.

“At this intersection it is a common occurrence to find ACT plated vehicles frozen by uncertainty; foot on the brake, mouth agape, unsure when to go and who to give way to,” Mr Barilaro said.

And the nearby Crestview Tourist Park has also praised the development. A spokesperson said that the development would be welcomed, as visitors unfamiliar with the area were easily confused.

The roundabout is planned to be completed by end of April next year.

Construction of the roundabout will take 14 weeks, and is due to start early next year following design approval from NSW Roads and Maritime Services.

 

Copyright © 2013 Queanbeyan Age 

Giant baby overtakes screen in new commercial for Nationwide Insurance.

Advertising commercial adopts a rather clever and creative approach. #Example 1.

Gods of Advertising


Good Lord, that baby will destroy us all!

So, I’m watching football this weekend when on comes this giant ass baby. I was like What The F—k? There’s a humongous baby in this dude’s garage. Then it’s bawling its eyes out in front of a gushing fire hydrant. A car crashes. And then it’s over.

Is this a trailer for a new movie? “Honey, I enlarged the kids!” It wasn’t a beer commercial. Taken aback, I open up my laptop and search “giant baby TV” or something similar. On YouTube I find the gargantuan infant. He (at least I think it’s a he) is the star of a new commercial for Nationwide Insurance!

I watch it again. And still I’m bewildered. The giant baby is so distracting I miss the point of the commercial. Upon further review, I get the gist of it. The voice over (none other than Julia…

View original post 167 more words

Using Narrative Techniques Responsibly in Journalism

I found a treaure while studying for one of my recent and final assignments, it is ‘The Ethics of the Story’ by David Craig. It was written in 2006, but I just discovered this now, and will have to find a copy on Amazon.

the-ethics-of-the-story

“Conscientious journalism students juggling classes and student or professional media work also have a hard time stopping and focusing on the nuances of technique. It is easy for them to pick up the habits and conventions that produce adequate but not excellent journalism,” (Craig, D., 2006, p.194.)

This resonates with me at the moment, as I have had difficulty balancing time for reflection as I am starting to enter the workforce.

Although, reading this book is a reminder of why sometimes we should take time just to consider what we have written and the important and powerful ethical decisions we make in what we include, and exclude.

A great read, and I am going to add this to my bookshelf and try to read it often even when I am no longer a student as a reminder of the power of journalism. I feel that it is the perfect time to read this book now, as I cross over from being a student to a working professional. And I believe that professionals should read this book too, if not more than students – because it’s probably been awhile since your last reflection! Check it out.

Cassidy Brown

November 13′