Tom Wolfe and New Journalism in The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test

Reading this book, you can’t help but feel a sense of being there with the Merry Pranksters on their journey.  tom_wolfe_05

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

On Writing Leads

* Please note this work belongs to the Queanbeyan Age. All rights reserved.

This is the before and after of one of my late stories, polished by my editor.

The lead is strong in this story, it is a colourful example, which offers the reader a vivid and interesting introduction.

Previously my lead didn’t throw to the situation, and was more factual. In this scenario the colour added to what was otherwise a very run of the mill type of article.

The structure is also improved, re, ordering of points.

Roundabout Time – before

STOP signs positioned at all but one of four entries into the Donald and Southbar road intersection in Queanbeyan has left drivers at their own crossroads.

Do they go and risk being plummeted into by another driver, or do they stop?

Locals told The Queanbeyan Age that the intersection was a major safety concern. Donald Road resident Anthony Perrott said the main danger  was its “confusing” design.

“People coming up the hill don’t seem to stop, they think it is confusing,” Mr Perrott said.

“I know my road rules, you give right of way to the right so the stop signs are a bit ridiculous, but I know a lot of people around here don’t realise what to do,” Mr Perrott said.

“You’re supposed to stop [at a stop sign], not keep rolling,” he said.

Mr Perrott moved to Donald road one year ago with his partner, and he has already witnessed several near misses.  With a number of roundabouts in close proximity, Mr Perrott encouraged another to ease traffic congestion.

“There are still going to be accidents certainly, but it might slow people down a bit, it is about time something is done,” he said.

There have been ten reported crashes at the intersection in the last five years alone, placing the junction at the forefront of the Queanbeyan City Council’s funding plans.

Without the assistance of the Queanbeyan City Council, the project would not have been feasible, said Roads Minister Duncan Gay.

“The NSW Government has allocated $308,000 for the new roundabout with a further $308,000 provided by Queanbeyan City Council which will carry out the work,” Minister Gay said.

While locals such as Mr Perrott feel confident about the road rules, it is Canberra drivers in particular that concerned Member for Monaro, John Barilaro.

“At this intersection it is a common occurrence to find ACT plated vehicles frozen by uncertainty; foot on the brake, mouth agape, unsure when to go and who to give way to,” Mr Barilaro said.

Known for its many roundabouts, it is expected that Canberra will rejoice in Queanbeyan’s newest addition, but they won’t be the only ones.

Nearby, Crestview Tourist Park operates, adding to the traffic congestion and strain in the hot spot.   A spokesperson said that the development would be welcomed, as visitors unfamiliar with the area were easily confused.

The roundabout is planned to be completed by end of April next year.

Construction of the roundabout will take 14 weeks, and is due to start early next year following design approval from NSW Roads and Maritime Services.

After

STOP signs positioned at three of the four entries into the Donald and Southbar road intersection in Queanbeyan has left drivers at their own crossroads.

Do they go and risk being plummeted into by another driver, or do they stop and wait?

However a new roundabout is set to put an end to the confusion, with the NSW Government and Queanbeyan City Council each contributing $308,000 to the upgrade.

Locals told The Queanbeyan Age that the intersection had been a major safety concern. Donald Road resident Anthony Perrott said the main danger was its “confusing” design.

“People coming up the hill don’t seem to stop, they think it is confusing,” Mr Perrott said.

“I know my road rules, you give right of way to the right so the stop signs are a bit ridiculous, but I know a lot of people around here don’t realise what to do,” Mr Perrott said.

“You’re supposed to stop [at a stop sign], not keep rolling,” he said.

Mr Perrott moved to Donald road one year ago with his partner, and he has already witnessed several near misses. With a number of roundabouts in close proximity, Mr Perrott encouraged another to ease traffic congestion.

“There are still going to be accidents certainly, but it might slow people down a bit, it is about time something is done,” he said.

There have been ten reported crashes at the intersection in the last five years alone, placing the junction at the forefront of the Queanbeyan City Council’s funding plans.

While locals such as Mr Perrott feel confident about the road rules, it is Canberra drivers in particular that concerned Member for Monaro, John Barilaro.

“At this intersection it is a common occurrence to find ACT plated vehicles frozen by uncertainty; foot on the brake, mouth agape, unsure when to go and who to give way to,” Mr Barilaro said.

And the nearby Crestview Tourist Park has also praised the development. A spokesperson said that the development would be welcomed, as visitors unfamiliar with the area were easily confused.

The roundabout is planned to be completed by end of April next year.

Construction of the roundabout will take 14 weeks, and is due to start early next year following design approval from NSW Roads and Maritime Services.

 

Copyright © 2013 Queanbeyan Age